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Victorian Majolica Specialist 

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What is MAJOLICA?
Victorian Majolica was produced from 1849 through 1900.  Majolica is a lead or tin glazed earthenware which is first fired to the biscuit stage.  Then it is decorated with brightly colored metallic glazes and fired again.  This gives the piece the brilliance which is characteristic of majolica.

Early majolica like that of Herbert
Minton focused on Renaissance motifs; lions, rams, mythological figures.  Other favorite subjects for majolica are leaves, fruit, vegetables, and other plants, animals, birds and shells.  The oriental influence began to appear as early as 1862 in London.  Monkeys, elephants, bamboo, birds and fans were favorite subjects.  By 1900 the production of majolica all but ceased due to the over production and changing taste.

A large portion of majolica is unmarked and must be identified through the presence of certain characteristics.  English marked pieces may display marks of
Minton, Wedgwood, George Jones, Joseph Holdcroft, Samuel Lear, S. Fielding, Worcester Royal Porcelain, W.T. Copeland and Wm. Brownfield or can be identified simply by it's British registry mark.

Well known American potters include Griffen, Smith and Hill, Edwin Bennett, Eureka Potteries, George Morley, and Chesapeake Pottery.  Many wonderful examples of continental majolica exist which are represented by Sarreguemines, Luneville, Saint Clement, Choisy-le-Roi, Onnaing and Villeroy and Boch to name a few.

The 5 main characteristics of majolica are:
1.  Majolica is a soft and porous
earthenware

2.  Decorative pattern is part of the mold

3.  Glaze is lead or tin based

4.  Same palette of colored glazes are used from piece to piece and manufacturer to manufacturer.

5.  Majolica is humorous and fun.

Some words on condition:
Experienced majolica collectors look for the 5 characteristic above and are fairly forgiving if a nice piece has a small chip or hairline.  Majolica is a fragile art form and few pieces have survived this long without some minor damage.  Condition will always have some effect on price, but a nice rare item with some damage will make a great addition to your collection.
 

Contact Us
info@eMajolica.com
or Phone (972)
596-3429

Some other links that might interest you!


  The Majolica International Society

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Go to the Sarreguemines Museum

Josiah Wedgwood

Learn more about Josiah Wedgwood

Visit the Wedgwood Society
of Great Britain

Visit the Fielding Pottery Site

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  972.596.3429
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